Glass Eye Studio - Celestial Northern Lights

The Northern Lights, or “Aurora Borealis” has long fascinated people all over the world with its stunning display of shifting colors. Swirling colored glass and sparkling dichro pay tribute to this phenomenal occurrence in nature with Glass Eye Studio Northern Lights paperweight.

A stunning paperweight and/or decorative piece of art, The Celestial Northern Lights Paperweight is part of the Celestial Planet Collection.  It makes a wonderful gift for both personal and corporate occasions, or it can be the perfect addition to your own Glass Eye Studio Collection.  

3" wide in diameter, it comes in a beautiful velvet keepsake box with a story card that tells its unique tale.  A blend of imagination, science, art and creativity, this Glass Eye Studio Celestial paperweight is fascinating.  There is a special effect on this dichroic glass that makes it change colour when it reflects or transmits light.  

All Glass Eye Studio products are handmade and individually crafted by artists.  They are made with the ash from Mount St. Helens volcano eruption (in Washington state) that occurred at 8:32:17 A.M. on Sunday, May 18, 1980.

Northern Lights can be seen in the northern or southern hemisphere, in an irregularly shaped oval centred over each magnetic pole. The bright dancing lights of the aurora are actually collisions between electrically charged particles from the sun that enter the earth's atmosphere. The lights are seen above the magnetic poles of the northern and southern hemispheres.The lights are known as "Aurora borealis" in the north and "Aurora australis"  in the south. Scientists have learned that in most instances northern and southern auroras are mirror-like images that occur at the same time, with similar shapes and colors. Auroral displays appear in many colours although pale green and pink are the most common. Shades of red, yellow, green, blue, and violet have been reported. The lights appear in many forms from patches or scattered clouds of light to streamers, arcs, rippling curtains or shooting rays that light up the sky with an eerie glow. The Northern Lights are actually the result of collisions between gaseous particles in the Earth's atmosphere with charged particles released from the sun's atmosphere. Variations in colour are due to the type of gas particles that are colliding. The most common auroral color, a pale yellowish-green, is produced by oxygen molecules located about 60 miles above the earth. Rare, all-red auroras are produced by high-altitude oxygen, at heights of up to 200 miles. Nitrogen produces blue or purplish-red aurora. The lights of the Aurora generally extend from 80 kilometres to as high as 640 kilometres above the earth's surface. An explosion of incredible colours!

 

 




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